Bigger May Not Always Be Better

Here is interesting take on how transportation can impact economic growth.  Not sure I buy the full argument but it would be hard to dismiss the notion.  I would contend that this way of looking at transportation needs to include data networks and internet access since this is the way modern products are brought market and how people “get around”

For vibrant economy, transportation networks matter more than city size
By Christina Hernandez

‘Coworking,’ a cooperative for the modern age

By Dan Fostt
SAN FRANCISCO —Contemplating his career path a couple of years ago, a young computer programmer named Brad Neuberg faced a modern predicament. “It seemed I could either have a job, which would give me structure and community,” he said, “or I could be freelance and have freedom and independence. Why couldn’t I have both?”

 

‘Coworking,’ a cooperative for the modern age – The New York Times

Why Some Communities Just Can’t Compete

Here is a good article that does a good job of laying out the basic issue and the conflict many communities are facing with sub-par broadband options that inhibit their competitive positions in the world economy..

This article indirectly makes the much the same point that the US didn’t develop the world’s most powerful manufacturing capacity by waiting for Wal-Mart to build an interstate highway system to move those goods to market.  The successful economies in the world merely applied this important lesson the US seems to have forgotten, when the Internet began to replace the highway as the main means to markets.

Our failure to remember our own lessons and a rigid adherence to mistaken dogma have caused the US average broadband speeds to continue to drop dramatically behind the rest of the developed world.
———————————-

An Open Letter to North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue: Support Community Broadband